Skip to main content

About your Search

20130822
20130830
SHOW
News 11
Today 5
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 60
CSPAN 28
CNNW 24
MSNBC 19
ALJAZAM 15
KNTV (NBC) 15
CNN 14
KPIX (CBS) 14
KQED (PBS) 14
CSPAN2 13
KRCB (PBS) 12
KGO (ABC) 11
SFGTV2 10
SFGTV 8
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 317
French 2
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 322 (some duplicates have been removed)
leader congressman john lewis. there will an number of bands and choirs performing in front of the crowd. joining us now from the lincoln memorial our mike viqueira. we have our dr. aubrey hendri hendrix{^l" ^}, and dr. williams of history and codirector of black studies. dr. hendrix, i want to start with you because you had a front-row seat to history last night. you were dining with a few important people. who might that have been. >> well, it was a large reception. i wasn't exactly dining with them. >> that's how we tell the story. >> janet lewis, a number of the king familie family, a number of religious leaders and it was a wonderful, best afire i've been to at the white house. >> one of the interesting things about working in washington as long as i did, there is a tendency when the audience watches the president, when they watch dr. king, they think they're watching someone who is larger than life. these are people who are trust in a moment of history p what was it like for him knowing this was going to be a big day for him as well. >> he was joking about it a little bit. he said,
books and authors. booktv.org. >> lewis lehman is next on booktv. lewis lehman served on president reagan's gold commission and called for a return to the gold standard which he argues will help improve our economy. this is about an hour. >> welcome to the cato institute, a and director of financial regulation studies at the cato institute and served as moderator at today's event. one cannot long study the history of monetary policy without at some point coming across the writings of lewis lehman, whether it is his occasional offense in the wall street journal or numerous books, lewis lehman has a uniquely accessible and insightful style when discussing monetary policy. it was for this reason among others lewis lehman was chosen to serve on the u.s. gold commission where he co-authored with the minority report the case results which i will note you can download a free copy of from tivo.org. the debate over monetary policy to the extent that they even take place had dominated by keynesian and moderates. lewis lehman's work has been instrumental -- the central flaw in these debates i
from oprah winfrey. she uis to be followed by congressman john lewis. the king family will be introduced as well. let me bring in briefly john hopkins university professor, civil rights historian nathan connelly. let me get your perspective to what we're seeing from 50 years ago briefly before hearing from congressman lewis, and in his place, being the last of these great men who stood there. >> the context that leads us into the march on washington in 1963 tells us a lot about what we should be thinking about going forward. economic growth did not mean the same thing as economic justice. in the ten years that led into the march on washington, the american economy grew. the gdp by some 41%. at the same time, african-americans were suffering massive unemployment at a rate twice that of whites. those who did have jobs were largely consigned to jobs as domestics or underpaid agricultural workers. about 42% of african-americans, again in city, were living below the poverty line of $3,000 a year. so the march on washington in john lewis' attempt, in some case, to put a face
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with john lewis. he is a congressman from georgia, a democrat. he was one of the big six leaders of the civil rights movement andrmanaif the student nonviolent committee. this year, 2013, marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march on washington. on that day in august, lewis was one of only 10 speakers who took to the steps of the lincoln memorial. he was just 23 years old. john lewis remains the last speaker still living. he has now told his story in a graphic novel. it is called "march, book one." i am pleased to have john lewis back at this table. welcome. >> thank you very much. good to see you, my friend, my brother. thank you for having me. >> rose: good. take me back. take me back to august 28, 1963, 50 years ago. >> well, 50 years ago i was only 23 years old, as you stated. it was an unbelievable day. on that day, 10 of us went up on capitol hill. we met with the leadership of the house and the senate, both democrats and republicans. then we came out of the senate building on constitution av
. >>> georgia congressman don lewis wrote a comic book but called it "march" to inspire a new generation. i sat down with lewis and got the story. this day calls you. to fight chronic osteoarthritis pain. to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step. today, you will know you did something for your pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a pain reliever fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. anti-depressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not for children under 18. people taking maois, linezolid or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid pain relievers, aspirin, or blood thinners may increase bleeding risk. severe liver problems, some fatal, were reported. signs include abdominal pain and yellowing skin or eyes. tell your doctor about all your medicines, including those for migraine and whil
lewis, one of the last major speakers from the 1963 rally, still alive today, urged the crowd to fight the supreme court decision that nullified much of the voting rights act of 1965. >> i gave a little blood in sel sel sel selma, alabama for the right to vote. i'm not going to allow the supreme court to take the right to vote away from us. >> keynote speaker al sharpton said there's much more to do in the area of jobs and equality and giving a hand to those who need it. >> they have the money for the 1%. but when it comes to head start, when it comes to municipal working. when it comes to our teachers, they stop the check. we're going to make you make the check good or we're going to close down the banks. >> as the day wore on, one message seemed to resonate with many who came to washington 50 years later. they need to keep on marching. >> retired history teacher and nea member who was here 50 years ago and again today put it in perspective. >> it's a march that has energized people to take an interest to the government and what it can do for people in this country and maybe this one
lewis is next. and the man who inspired is ted cruz, his father, rafael. [ male announcer ] what's important to you? at humana, our medicare agents sit down with you and ask. hanging out with this guy. he's just the love of my life. [ male announcer ] getting to know you is how we help you choose the humana medicare plan that works best for you. mi familia. ♪ [ male announcer ] we want to help you achieve your best health, so you can keep doing the things that are important to you. keeping up with them. i love it! [ male announcer ] helping you -- now that's what's important to us. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> congressman john lewis marched with martin luther king jr., sat in at lunch countering and literallterally bled for tht to vote. now he is reaching out to a new generation with a graphic novel on the civil rights movement. >> are you the boy from troy? are you john lewis? i just want to meet the boy from troy. i was so scared. who is this young man? that wanted to segregate, i d
with the significance of that march. nothing moved the crowd quite like representative john lewis, who was one of the original organizers of the march and the youngest speaker at the original march in 1963. he talked to the crowd about what inclusiveness and civil rights means today. >> all of us, it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people, we're one family, we're one house. we all live in the same house. back in 1963, we hadn't heard of the internet. we didn't have a cellular telephone. but we used what we had to bring about the non-violent revolution and i said to all the young people, you must get out there and push and pull and make america what america should be for all of us! >> reporter: and again, we talked about this being the beginning, not the end. on wednesday, president barack obama will be here along with former presidents bill clinton and jimmy carter along with a lot of hollywood celebrities like jamey foxx, oprah winfrey. they will be marking that 50th anniversary
and gene get on a plane and come up here. >> reporter: this is important. >> yeah. >> reporter: john lewis, the newly appointed chairman of the student non-violent committee was already there. >> when we met with president kennedy, he was afraid there would be violence. >> how long can we be patient? >> reporter: like king, lewis was one of the march organizers and speakers. >> we want to be free now. >> reporter: at what point did you recognize it as an historic moment? >> when i stepped to the podium, i saw hundreds and hundreds of young people. i said to myself, this is it. >> reporter: the civil rights movement was in many ways a youth movement. dr. king was 34, lewis, 23. you were still a kid. >> i grew up. when you had been sitting on the lunch counter stool and someone walks up and spits on you, or pour hot water or hot coffee on you, and you are committed to non-violence. you have to grow up. to go on freedom rides in 1961, the same year that president barack obama was born, and to be beaten, you had to grow up. so by the time of the march on washington i was 23, but an older perso
something productive, lewis has been such a great partner, we carried that partnership on. we've gone, we've truly taken, gone around the bend here and gone from talk to action with this partnership. one of the things, one of the few things we really could do was help to be a pipeline to supplies because like i said, they were running low on some things. their feeding centers were starting to shut down, they were running out of dry goods. so we set up, anybody who is familiar with what's called aid matrix, it's essentially the craig's list of donations. you have to have a sponsor and you have to set up a portal and there's some costs associated with that and we set up an aid matrix for van, turkey. we've been able to arrange for some supplies to get there. not near as much as i would like, but one of the big challenges is transportation. it takes a few extra days to get there and there's really no trucks to do it. we are going to go back, maybe this time in the summer rather than the winter. we keep in touch with what's happening there and we keep the portal there and we keep pushin
and the person that will be introducing the panel, lewis loeven. i have to tell you, lewis loeven is the person that put all this together. he's worked months for this so i want to thank you publicly, lewis, for this. >> thank you. while the panelists are coming up i'd just like to tell you when general myat and i went down to brief secretary schultz a couple months ago, he invited admiral roughhead and secretary perry into the briefing we had a discussion about the whole program at fleet week. we talked about all the public events that went on but we also talked a lot and concentrated a lot on the senior leadership program and what the rest of disaster preparedness was about. in that conversation we started talking about the internationals a special agent of fleet week. secretary perry actually suggested that we extend invitations to people from around the world that they might benefit from the discussions that we're having. admiral roughhead suggested that his friends from chile had an experience down in their part of the world with an earthquake and thought it would be a good idea for u
, of course, president barack obama. plus, civil rights icon, congress n congressman john lewis, the only surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington will deliver his remarks. first we'll hear from superstar oprah winfrey. oprah is scheduled to speak any minute now. we wait for oprah winfrey and others to take to the podium, and they will begin to speak. joining me here in washington is my colleague, wolf blitzer. wolf, of course, you noaa wa very well. you have covered washington for decades. what does today mean for you and the nation's capital? >> it means a great deal. it means so much because all of us who have lived through these 50 years remember what it was like then. remember what we've gone through over these so many years. we know, of course, what it's like right now. don, it's very, very fascinating that at a sensitive moment like this, when the president of the united states getting ready to deliver his important remarks commemorating the 50th anniversary of dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech, he is right now also so preoccupied with the number one c
. >> president obama was among those celebrating king's legacy with his friend congressman john lewis. he was there on the march on washington and has a series of graphic novels chronicling the event. we spoke with him. wewhen i was growing up, would go downtown and see signs, white men, colored men, white women, colored women. go upstairs to the balcony, and i would come home and asked my mother and father, my grandparents why. they would say, that is the way it is. you not get in the way. do not get in trouble. when i first heard martin luther king, junior, it inspired me. i think in some strange way he was saying, you can do something. you can make a contribution. i wanted to attend troy state college. it was a school that had never admitted lack students, so i wrote a letter to martin luther king, junior, and told him i needed his help. area byme of bus ticket old, and i am 18 years i was scared. dr. king said, are you john lewis? are you the boy from troy? from then they called me the boy from troy. we became friends. the first time happened in nashville. was waiting to be served, an
have to think is maybe a little embarrassed. >> lewis got a bit disoriented and tried to get out the window. we're glad you're with i, lewis. would you please again give lewis and keely a hand? come on. give them a big cheer. glad you are here. thank you, roger. >>> guys, i'm here to answer the very age old question, is spaghetti lethal? >> i've been wondering about this every time i throw those noodles into the pot of boiling water. >> to help us answerhat question we have channel. >> today we want to find out if we can weaponize spaghetti. it's going to be really interesting. >> cooked spaghetti and raw spe getity. >> what? >> first he's going to take a bundle of spaghetti. he's going to turn it into an ax handle. >> turn it in, rubber, so they're very solid. >> he re-enforced it. >> still, deadly spaghetti. >> he chops right into the gelatin. >> it's ballistics gel, not jello. he's going to make a bow for his cross bow. >> interesting. i think it's a proven fact now that there is impact. >> what can you do with cooked spaghetti, though? it's mushy. >> you sound like you very l
champion lewis hamilton is the man charged with getting his team back in pole position. >> lewis hamilton, the winner of the last grand prix and the man sebastian calls his greatest rival -- he is on a mission to recapture the title busting days of the 1990's. mercedes have struggled since returning three years ago. >> the position we were in even last year is a long way from where we wanted to be. we have to try and stay where we are now. if we can maintain that level and fight for the title, then that is a best case scenario. >> but mercedes strong showing is creating new challenges, and some tough decisions need to be made. many teams are concentrating on developing cars for the 2014 season. the introduction of new engines means the cars will be completely different next year. but if the team wants to stay in the race for next year's championship, it cannot ignore 2013. >> we are putting more effort into next year's car than this years, but we've had time to prepare, and we can choose when and where to do the aerodynamic testing sessions. if the 2014 car pans out, then we can give more
changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. and this march tomorrow is one of five days that you have helped to orchestrate and push and pull and make sure it happened. but you were a child when this happened. >> i was an infant. >> in arms when the march happened. and you were still very young when you lost your dad. how do you explain the fire in you? >> well, i mean, other than the holy spirit, that's where it comes from. it also comes from growing up in a home where we were taught about giving back service to our community. and also because my mother was so passionate. and we could sense and feel and see her passion. and i think that transferred to all of us in different a
that was busted. we'll tell you what else investigators found. >>> congressman john lewis tells a crowd gathered to mark the 50th anniversary on the march on washington that the fight for equal rights is not over. >> we cannot give up. we cannot give out. we cannot give in. >> lewis was the youngest speaker during the 1963 civil rights march and we're going to speak with him about what the movement still needs to accomplish. >>> miley cyrus causing a lot of blushing last night at the vma awards. why parents are now kind of angry. nts and alumni. people like, maria salazar, an executive director at american red cross. or garlin smith, video account director at yahoo. and for every garlin, thousands more are hired by hundreds of top companies. each expanding the influence of our proud university of phoenix network. that's right, university of phoenix. enroll now. we've got a frame waiting for you. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for her, she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with her all day to see how it goes. [ claira ] after the deliveries, i was
. >>> and we'll hear from congressman john lewis, the last surviving speaker from the march from the same exact spot he spoke 50 years ago today. this is a special edition of "politicsnation." stay with us. >> we must seize this moment. the dawning of a new day. the emergence of a new generation who is postured to change the world through collaborative power facilitated by unconditional love. >> when we freedom ring from every village and hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men and white men, jews and gentiles, protestants and catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the negro spirit free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. nascar is ab.out excitement but tracking all the action and hearing everything from our marketing partners, the media and millions of fans on social media can be a challenge. that's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business
the speech. >>> and we'll hear from congressman john lewis, the last surviving speaker from the march from the same exact spot he spoke 50 years ago today. this is a special edition of "politicsnation." stay with us. >> we must seize this moment. the dawning of a new day. the emergence of a new generation who is postured to change the world through collaborative power facilitated by unconditional love. >> when we freedom ring from every village and hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men and white men, jews and gentiles, protestants and catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the negro spirit free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >>> the march to complete the dream continues. that's next. >>> tens of thousands of people gathered today to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. it was a celebration of the progress we've made since dr. king's speech, but it was also a reminder of the work that remains. president obama talked about fighting the economic
we have the privilege of serving with john lewis, some of us for over 25 years in the congress, and aren't we proud of that. i also want to mention that 50 years ago, though he was not a member of congress at the time that john conyers was one of three people invited to the white house to meet with president john f. kennedy following the civil rights march, the march for jobs, justice and freedom, who is with us. 50 years ago we had the first catholic president in the white house. today we have the first african-american president and the first african-american first family leading our country so beautifully from the white house. you know we come together here at a time when there is a monument to reverend martin luther king on the mall. here he sits with presidents of the united states so appropriately. we have a day set aside as a national holiday to celebrate his birthday. but he would want us to celebrate him, his birth and his legacy by acting upon his agenda, by realizing the dream, by making the minimum wage a living wage, by having not just family and medical leave, but
. the youngest speaker at the march was a 23-year-old civil rights organizer from alabama named john lewis. leader of the student nonviolence coordinating committee. by the time of the march, lewis had been arrested 24 times for his activism during nonviolent protest. >> i want to hear a yell and thunder from all those people who are out there under the tree. let's hear you. >> there is a lot of noble talk about brotherhood. and then some americans drop the brother and keep the hood. this rally is not the end. it's the beginning. it's the beginning of a great moral crusade. to allow america do the unfinished work of american democracy. the congress has to act. >> by the forces of our demands, our determination and our numbers, we shall splitter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. >> we must say wake up, america, wake up, for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> bob dylan played his new song, only a pawn in their game, about the murder of metger evers. peter paul and mary all he formed. and then there was d
welcome, shall, to the uss macon islands. my name is lewis loeven and i'm the executive director of the san francisco fleet week association and what a great fleet week we're going to have for 2012. thank you. this is the second time we've had the uss macon islands and i want to thank captain pringle and his entire crew. what a great ship and what a great crew. they turned this swear hanger deck around all right night and turned it into a conference room and it looks absolutely beautiful. thank you, captain, and your entire crew. i'm going to make this short because we're already running a little bit behind schedule, but san francisco fleet week for the third year is organized with i object credible participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots o
, there is john lewis, looking very, very young. lynn, you've said that john lewis's speech was very important to you. >> it was. he was not much older than i, and just hearing him speak out in the spirit that i believed in of really stepping forward and agitating and making sure what was needed would happen, i think he spoke to the young people that day. >> i'm sorry, go ahead. >> brother lewis told me when i gave him that photo, he said that that's a scared rabbit. [ laughter ] >> he said that he was 22 and about to address the nation, and had just been through the mill, because his speech was very militant, and i mean, not that anybody disagreed with anything he said, it was just that they -- we were there to try to persuade people, not to provoke them. >> tough to thing of june lewis as a scared rabbit under any circumstances. >> in fact, his speech was toned down. it was insisted that he tone it down. i think he had intended about marching through the south the way that sherman marched to the sea. >> non-violently. [ laughter ] >> i think that made the whole day so miraculous, because eve
legend and today a veteran congressman john lewis was among the leaders on hand for the unveiling of a new commemorative stamp. people have been boarding buses to washington from places like new orleans and atlanta. their issues are among the same ones 50 years ago, barriers to education, economic inequality. >> i actually think we were making some strides until trayvon martin's trial. how many of you had an opportunity to see that ? >> the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, it will be a big part of our coverage over the next few days here on america tonight. we'll take a look back at those amazing days and the dramatic events that led up is to the march and we'll get some insider stories on how, dr. king 's, story, delivering birmingham to the world. >> without birmingham 1963, the letter from the birmingham jail, it is unlikely that there would have been a march on washington. the letter was a national call to the conscience of america. using the real life, real time reality of birmingham as its template. >> clarence jones will join us next week. he'll tell us how he s
welcome the king family welcoming the honorable john lewis of georgia. [ applause ] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome president jimmy carter, president bill clinton, first lady michelle obama and the president of the united states, barack obama. [ applause ] >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for our national anthem, portland by identity for pop. ♪ oh say can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilights last gleaming ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright star stars through the perilous fight ♪ ♪ oer the ramparts we watch were so gallantly stream iing ♪ ♪ and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh say does that star spangled banner yet sway ♪ ♪ oer the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪ [ applause ] >> ladies and gentlemen, john lew lewis. >> president and mrs. obama, president clinton, president cart carter, i want to thank bernice king and the king family and the national park service for inviting me here to speak today. when i
. there was reason for that. even john lewis was preaching civil disobedience until early that morning. but we went out on the street. but it was not an angry crowd. these were respectful people. we came back and that realization slowly dawned on people in the room that, as you heard on the jfk film clip, with great relief this was going to be not just a political demonstration. this was going to be a monumental for wlak america. >> you mention the dixiecrats, white southern democrats, but we have a clip -- this was from governor, not a senator, george wallace, one of the preeminent dixie crats of '60s, responding to john f. kennedy, saying positive things about the march. >> the president has said this is in the great tradition. i shall look forward to being there, but at the same time, the great tradition, they have already alerted thousands upon thousands of troops in the area of washington for preparation for this matter and so this great tradition of marching in washington, on the one hand being invited, on the other hand, they're preparing for -- as if we were going to have a civil war in was
. she spoke today eloquently. john lewis, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement took a horrendous beating. my dad was there that day, and at the speech. so i was taken with it, still am. i think martin luther king will go down in history as at least one or two most important americans of the 20th century. >> bolling? >> i think president obama is a fantastic speaker. he puts together a nice speech, delivers it perfectly. i find it kind of interesting on this day where president obama approaches the podium and speaks about martin luther king junior, martin luther king junior was a passivist, he was anti-war. so this overhang of syria over president obama right now, with the decision, maybe it is go time in syria on the steps where martin luther king 50 years ago spoke about a peaceful world, about chain reaction of evil, war is producing more wars, must be broken or we shall be plunged into the dark annihilation. he's caught between a rock and a hard place right now. >> tough place to be. >> i was going to go to miss tantaros. >> no question, the turning point for a ve
made noise like john lewis said today and he said i think we have to be sympathetic to vietnam and draft dodgers as they were called back then and tried to not allow julian to have a seat to be represented and then he has gone on his whole career. it has been so bray. recently he was arrested over the keystone pipeline. he has fought for gay marriage so when we are talking about all of the great figures of this r era, julian bond really deserves a call out. in the history field he always makes sure scholars like myself are exact and anybody doing a ph.d. dissertation clears it with him because he is a meticulous scholar of the movement. >> doctor, let me bring you in. >> i went to a church in albany, georgia, and a woman was praying one night and said i have a dream. king heard that. in his typical baptist preacher fashion said i will use that one day, and so he extracted that phrase from prathea hall, one of the great preachers of her generation, now dead, and she was a member of snip and he used that energy of prayer and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroi
congressman, reverend john lewis. he is not only a fierce civil rights activist, but he is also a staunch environmental champion. he has said that the environmental movement is an extension of civil and human rights, and that is because the childrenthese and everywhere are the most impacted and adversely impacted, disproportionally impacted. in a world justice where powerful people and theorations can affect lives of every man, woman and child. our children cannot prosper if we continue to destroy the natural systems that support all of our lives. our children cannot prosper and they are sick and from -- ackened from exposure to toxic cocktail of chemicals that are unregulated and untested in the air they breathe, the water they drink, the food they eat, and the product they use. our children and their children cannot prosper when they face a future of record temperatures, .ising seas and extreme weather unless we work together, we will be handing our children problems that they cannot solve. time is running out. we have a moral mandate to protect and to preserve our children's health, qu
have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a. philip randolph, bayard rustin, congressman john lewis, dorothy height, on behalf of those whose names will never be known, we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and poor, to the ceo and a sanitation worker, and those with and those without. we have the responsibility to build on a legacy that has been left to us all. we must protect the most fundamental rights we have, the right to vote. we must ensure corporate forces will never be silent. we must fight for good jobs and decent pay. and we must become a just and fair society of our ideals. above all, we must uphold the principle that everyone who contributes to the prosperity of this nation should share in the prosperity of our nation. thank you. [applause] >> please welcome the u.s. representative from maryland's fourth district, the honorable donna edwards. >> i represent maryland's fourth congressional district. as the first african-american woman to represent maryland in the house of representatives, on behalf of my sisters in congress, i
the world's angriest man foaming at the mouth, lewis black. he's neck. looks to be furious. go on, look angry. ouncer ] we'll be with her all day to see how it goes. [ claira ] after the deliveries, i was okay. now the ciabatta is done and the pain is starting again. more pills? seriously? seriously. [ groans ] all these stops to take more pills can be a pain. can i get my aleve back? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits w
, lewis black. looks to be furious. go on, look angry. this store ke a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra an
, lewis black. he's neck. looks to be furious. go on, look angry. but they live so far away. i've been thinking about moving in with my daughter and her family. it's been pretty tough since jack passed away. it's a good thing you had life insurance through the colonial penn program. you're right. it was affordable, and we were guaranteed acceptance. guaranteed acceptance? it means you can't be turned down because of your health. you don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions. they don't care about your aches and pains. well, how do you know? did you speak to alex trebek? because i have a policy myself. it costs just $9.95 a month per unit. it's perfect for my budget. my rate will never go up. and my coverage will never go down because of my age. affordable coverage and guaranteed acceptance? we should give them a call. do you want to help protect your loved ones from the burden of final expenses? if you're between 50 and 85, you can get quality insurance that does not require any health questions or a medical exam. your rate of $9.95 a month per unit will never increa
. that was the theme echoed some 50 years ago. one who spoke here today spoke 50 years ago, congressman john lewis. before he spoke they heard from a man who bears the name of a man whose day and speech we remember all too well. only he is is the third, martin luther king iii. >> 50 years ago he delivered a sermon on this mountain, which crystallized like never before the painful pilgrimage, and aching aspirations of africa americanses yearning to breathe free in our own homelands. but martin luther king's utterings of 1963 were not laments of past injustices or a diatribe of true injustices of the day. but it was a tribute to the tenacity of an intrepid people who reused to remain in bondage. they were a clarion call to all people of good will to rise up together, to make this nation listen out the true meaning of its creed, and to perfect within us a more perfect union. and so i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. i am humbled by the heavy hand of history, but more than that i am--i, like you, continue to feel his presence. i, like you, continue to hear his voice cryi
francisco has a better tomorrow >> thank you very much. >> next speaker >> david elliott lewis. i'm against the prohibition i see it as a prohibition cabins free speech. while a lot of the speak might be commercial it gives an opportunity for groups to get their message out. not everybody follows twitter or facebook. i think getting a message out even 55 the unconventional ways i think it's a diversity we tolerate in our city. i hope this won't move forward. and i hope you won't ban this informational splie >> any additional public comment on to me 2. seeing none, public comment is closed. i am supportive of supporting this to those the to the call of the chair. and as i indicated a previous hearing i'm not a fan of aerial advisement i'm not a fan of those aerial advertisements. what i also is a and i think i indicated many of this in the past hearing i think this this legislation was rushed in the way s it was brought forward. and the normal deliver way we bring it forward it was dividing the file and we're duplicating the file and to take it from a brief america's cup restricti
to that village. >> reporter: it took ten years but she came to america finally making a home in lewis son, a farming community much like the one she left. >> here it's a small city. there is not a lot of jobs available for us, but my job is to farm, and this is my most important job. >> reporter: she works land provided by the new sustainable agriculture project and connects her with local farmers markets. >> you can tell this is where they feel most at home, and they feel most reconnected with the police that they lost. >> reporter: but some people in lewis ton worry that the new immigrants are a burden on the community. >> americans first. carries too much about other people. >> reporter: but she works hard harvesting crops from sun up to sundown and then goes home to feed the her nine children. they all live in this apartment, crowded but happy. >> who is the jokester of the family? >> him. >> yeah? >> reporter: dinner is at 10:00 p.m. and then it's up at 6:00 to take the harvest to the market. once petula has harvested her crops this is where she brings the fruits of her labor. from t
condition, but not in this case. and don lewis states as for the sequa documents i am stated that the project is vacant because there are no structures on the lot. when i visited this site a year ago there were a dozen cars parked. and as you know, we don't find the loss of parking on the impact of the entirement. but we do. and we are, we have two express ways that join south and east at the south end of potrero and the reason that people live and work in this neighborhood because of the easy access to the express way, there is predominantly commercial vehicles that do not provide parking and the club relies on the parking too, and when the neighborhood plan was formulated it was obvious that the traffic flow was not... >> thank you, ma'am. >> next speaker please? >> good afternoon commissioners i am sorry my voice is going. thank you for giving us this opportunity to voice our opposition to potrero avenue and we find that i cannot talk, i am sorry. >> i am going to have to use... >> and the next speaker please. >> if you just place it and it will go on when you start to spe
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 322 (some duplicates have been removed)